10 Foods Not To Eat By All Costs If You Want To Reduce Belly Fat

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Carrying some extra pounds on the gut comes from consuming more calories than you burn through exercise. No foods specifically add fat to your belly. They add fat to your whole body, which includes your belly. Likewise, avoiding specific foods won’t flatten your belly specifically. They’ll help you lose weight overall. In general, foods that are high in sugar or carbohydrates and foods that are hard to stop eating should be the first to go when you want to lose weight.

Sweets and Soda

Candy and sweets are empty calories.

Candy and other sweets offer nothing but calories, and plenty of them. According to Harvard nutritionist Walter Willett, if you want to lose belly fat, the first thing you should eliminate are high-calorie, low-value foods. At 150 empty calories per can, soda pop is a particularly bad form of sweet for diet purposes. For many people, drinking soda is an automatic part of lunch or dinner. By simply replacing this with water or iced tea, you can drop hundreds of calories per week from your diet.

Fast Food

Fast food is high in calories and low in nutrition.

A single fast-food meal often totals more than 2,000 calories, the recommended calorie intake for an entire day. Worse still, fast food is high in bad fats and low in nutrition.

Alcohol

Alcohol is high in calories and low in nutrition like sweets.

According to Willett, research shows that an alcoholic drink each day can help reduce your risk of heart disease. However, alcohol presents two problems. Like sweets, it has a high caloric content with little nutritional benefit. Also, drinking alcohol often leads to drinking more alcohol. A single night out drinking can mean taking in thousands of calories you would otherwise have done without.

Dairy

Dairy tends to be high in carbs.

Willet notes that dairy, although a good source of calcium, is also rich in carbohydrates and bad fats. While shedding your belly fat, it’s better to get your calcium from leafy green vegetables and other low-calorie options.

Refined Grains

Refined grains such as white bread give your body a sugar rush just like sweets.

Refined grains are pure carbohydrates, presenting your body with a sugar rush just like eating sweets. The calories from this rush are bad enough, but when the sugar high fades your body starts to feel hungry again. Dr. Mehmet Oz, co-author of “You: The Owner’s Manual” recommends eating whole and wild grains, which release their carbs more slowly.

Fruit Juice

Fruit juice is often high in sugar.

Fruit juice is subtle. It can contain many important nutrients, but it’s often high in sugar. Willett notes that many people seem to differentiate between “food calories” and “beverage calories,” not taking into account the effect of their liquid intake. Although a glass in the morning is OK, don’t make fruit juice your default beverage.

Snack Foods

Trail mix is very high in calories.

Snack foods such as chips, trail mix and pretzels are all right in moderation. However, like sweets, they are long on calories and low on nutritional value. For between-meal snacks, personal trainer Bill Phillips recommends vegetable sticks or a piece of fruit.

Potatoes

A baked potato is loaded with empty calories.

According to Willett, a single baked potato has nearly the identical effect on your body as eating a tablespoon of pure sugar. Like refined grains, these tubers are loaded with empty calories. Also like refined grains, when the sugar high fades, it leaves you hungry and craving more food.

High-Fructose Corn Syrup

High-Fructose corn syrup is found in many sugar laden foods.

Not exactly a food, this common ingredient combines the problems of sweets and of refined grains. Fructose is a sugar, adding calorie content while bringing no nutritional value to the table. Worse, recent evidence shows that high fructose corn syrup interferes with your body’s ability to realize it’s full. This means you’re not only eating fattening foods, but you’ll likely to eat more of them than you normally would.

Related Article

Lose Up To 24 Pounds Within 2 Weeks With This Boiled Egg Diet

The egg diet is a low-carbohydrate, low-calorie, but protein-heavy diet. It’s designed to help aid in weight loss without sacrificing the protein needed to build muscles. Like its name suggests, it emphasizes the consumption of eggs as a main source of protein.

The egg diet has multiple versions, but in each you can only drink water or zero-calorie beverages. Foods high in carbohydrates and natural sugars, like most fruits and all breads, pastas, and rice are eliminated from the diet, which typically lasts 14 days. You only eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner. There are no snacks, aside from water or other zero-calorie drinks.

Kết quả hình ảnh cho boiled egg diet

Egg diet meal plan

1st week:

*Monday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: two slices of meal bread and fruit
Dinner: cooked chicken and salad

*Tuesday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: cooked chicken and green salad
Dinner: orange, salad and two boiled eggs

*Wednesday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: one tomato, one slice of meal bread and low fat cheese
Dinner: cooked chicken and salad

*Thursday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: fruit
Dinner: streamed chicken

*Friday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs
Lunch: two boiled eggs and steamed vegetables
Dinner: barbecued fish and salad

*Saturday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs
Lunch: fruit
Dinner: steamed chicken and salad

*Sunday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: tomato salad and steamed vegetables with chicken
Dinner: streamed vegetables

The 2nd week:

*Monday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs
Lunch: salad and chicken
Dinner: orange, salad and two boiled eggs

*Tuesday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs
Lunch: two boiled eggs and steamed vegetables
Dinner: salad and barbecued fish

*Wednesday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: cooked chicken and salad
Dinner: orange, salad and two boiled eggs

*Thursday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: steamed vegetables, two boiled eggs and low fat cheese
Dinner: steamed chicken and salad

*Friday*

Breakfast:  two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: tuna salad
Dinner: two boiled eggs and salad

*Saturday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs and fruit
Lunch: cooked chicken and salad
Dinner: fruits

*Sunday*

Breakfast: two boiled eggs
Lunch and Dinner: steamed vegetables and steamed chicken

Consult with a doctor before starting with this diet. It is a simple menu, and to get even better results,  you should start exercising every day.

Side effects of the egg diet

The most common unwanted side effect of the egg diet is the lack of energy many people will feel from the depletion of carbs. This makes it difficult to exercise.

Suddenly shifting to a high-protein, low-carb diet can also be difficult for the digestive system to adjust to. You may experience nausea, constipation, flatulence, and bad breath as a result.

Eggs are also very high in cholesterol with 186 grams, or 63 percent of the daily recommended value. However, research has shown that it’s not the cholesterol in foods to worry about for heart health, but rather saturated and trans fats.

A 2015 study reported that men who consumed more than six eggs per week had a 30 percent higher risk of heart failure. They also had a higher risk of ischemic stroke. Eating six eggs or less per week in either men or women had no impact on hemorrhagic stroke, myocardial infarction, or heart failure.

Because eggs have no fiber, you’ll need to be careful to include other foods that do have ample amounts. This way, you won’t temporarily impair bowel function or starve your healthy gut bacteria.

Because this type of diet is not sustainable, many people revert back to old eating habits as soon as it’s over. They’ll likely gain the weight back, if not even more. This can lead to yo-yo dieting, which isn’t healthy.

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Is this diet safe?

The general consensus in the medical communities is that the egg diet isn’t the safest way to lose weight.

If you’re following any version of the egg diet, your calories will come in at under 1,000 calories a day. According to Harvard Medical School, it’s unsafe for women to consume less than 1,200 calories a day and for men to consume less than 1,500 unless supervised by a medical professional.

Eating up to seven eggs a week, or more in some studies, seems to be safe for the general population, with no seeming effect on cardiovascular risk. Doing so may actually reduce stroke risks. A 2015 study confirmed that even some people with diabetes can eat eggs more liberally than previously believed, about 12 per week, without worsening cholesterol levels or blood sugar control.

That said, a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet may be associated with higher risks of cardiovascular disease, according to one study. The disadvantage of this particular study is that it didn’t control or emphasize types of carbohydrate or protein sources, which could significantly influence the study outcome.

Eating enough fiber every day is crucial to nourishing gut bacteria. Americans already get far below the daily recommended fiber intake. Since fiber is primarily found in legumes, fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains, the egg diet could complicate an already low fiber intake.